Gail's Book Nook

Friday, May 26, 2017

Looking In The Window: In Honor Of Memorial Day

FREE GIFT BOOK

Messages: Poems and Short Stories To Live By will be free from Saturday, May 27 - Monday, May 29.





Find inspiration for our hectic times in these straight-forward poems for happy and sad days.

Find history, warmth and a touch of the paranormal(similar to the Twilight Zone) in three stories.

Getting the Goat peeks into the early 1900's when mountain life was tough. Does Mama's advice hold true today?

In Stitches in Love Rose's deep love for her grandmother motivates others to share their gifts. Does Rose reap her reward?

Robert Horner is tempted in The Stranger, but does he succumb to the lure?

From The Readers

“A beautiful book of stories made to savor. Gail Pallotta has put the magic and comfort back on the written page. Southern prose at its finest.” Donna Richards

“This book is full of inspiring poems and short stories that will bless your heart!” Sherri Johnson

“For joyful as well as down times, you will find encouragement in these wisdom filled poems and short stories. The poems give positive messages to lift our spirits, something we desperately require. The short stories return us to a simpler time, yet giving us hope in modern times...” VMLM

“This group of poems made me both laugh and cry. Gail Pallotta is a talented poet that compares to the best. Though I usually don't read poetry, I loved this collection.” Virginia J. Foster

One of the poems

Hope

There comes a day
when only dark clouds
light our way
and rain’s
ceaseless drops of blue
disguise the path
we thought we knew.

We cry
into our rooms of black
and only silence
answers back.

We listen
for a voice to care
and all we hear
is no one there.

Hope is lost
in deep, deep despair.
But wait.
Say a prayer.
God is there.




Story Excerpts

From Stitches in Love

Rose stood and weakness swept over her like a hurricane coming ashore. She let herself out and locked the door with the key Grandma Jackie had given her seven years ago—the year Rose had turned sixteen. Sobs erupted from the depths of her soul as she slipped into her two-door coupe and drove to 143 Broadway.

Within minutes she walked toward the white-columned two-story home while she bent double holding her stomach. It was a hot, dry day in Springdale, Georgia. No breeze stirred, and the humidity as high as a kite. Air conditioning caressed Rose's face when she opened the front door. Clearing the foyer, she hurried up the oak staircase to her room. Tears flooding her eyes blurred the flowers on the pink and green comforter as she stepped to it and fell face-down on the bed.

Amy, Rose's mama, had called last week about Grandma Jackie's health. Rose could hear her distressed words now.

"Mama hasn't been the same since Dad died. She's been slipping away little by little. The doctors say nothing is wrong other than high blood pressure and cholesterol, but she's just not herself. I've hired Miz Mary Clark, a local caretaker, to come during the day to make sure she takes her medicine and to tend to her personal needs."

That's why Rose had come home to see Grandma Jackie. It was worse than she had suspected. There must be something someone could do. She sat up and wiped her cheeks. What if she picked the peaches off the tree and told Grandma Jackie to make a pie? No. The last time Rose talked to Grandma Jackie on the phone she'd told Rose cooking at the homeless shelter wore her out.

Doing things for others pleased Grandma Jackie, but maybe she'd reached a time when she needed others to do something for her. What? She liked to read, but that wouldn't make her want to live. Sweat popped out on Rose's forehead. What did Grandma Jackie love enough to get up and do every day?

From Getting the Goat

What was wrong with this animal? Why did Father think he could handle her? His heart pounded as he stood. He raced after the unruly creature, blood flowing from a cut on his leg. She ran in a circle, Norman behind her panting until she halted and let him clutch the leash hanging by her side.

He led her to the tree, secured her, and brushed off his hands. Anger at the goat for her meanness festered inside him, but ire in the boy who wanted to be a man boiled over because she'd gotten the better of him. He hurried to the house and charged inside.

"Mother, look what the goat did."

His mother's eyes filled with compassion. "Sit down." She guided him to a straight back chair at the wooden kitchen table, grabbed a cloth, cleaned his wound and applied iodine. "I'm sorry. Leave the chore for today and try again tomorrow after school."

Norman gasped. "You want me to go back?"

From The Stranger

Stress shot through every muscle in Robert's body. "That's ridiculous, Mac. No one turns down money."

"I've been perfecting the design of these nails for years. I painted the tops to keep them separate from my regular supply." He picked up a nail and rolled it around in his hand. "I'm going to market these. Then you can have some for exactly what it costs to manufacture them."

Sweat popped out on Robert's forehead. "What's so unusual about them?"

Mac raised his dark, thick eyebrows. "I'll tell you and everyone else after my final test on Monday."
Robert tried to sound pitiful. "I need to put them in an old green table."

Mac laid down the nail and lifted a small box off the shelf. "Paint the tops of these nails." He handed them to Robert. "You can have them. The box is nearly empty."

"I'll give you a thousand dollars for the green-tipped nails."

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